Last edited by Dougrel
Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of Communicating cancer information found in the catalog.

Communicating cancer information

National Cancer Communications Conference (5th 1984 Washington, D.C.)

Communicating cancer information

new messages, new approaches and new potential : proceedings, the fifth National Cancer Communications Conference, February 15-17, 1984

by National Cancer Communications Conference (5th 1984 Washington, D.C.)

  • 4 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society in [Bethesda, Md.?], [New York, N.Y.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cancer -- United States -- Congresses

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. III-21

    SeriesNIH publication -- no. 85-2717, DHHS publication -- no. (NIH) 85-2717
    ContributionsNational Cancer Institute (U.S.), American Cancer Society
    The Physical Object
    Pagination1 v. (various pagings) :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14270139M

    with cancer. This review of the literature examines the communicative behaviors of nurses during care activities with patients who have cancer. The studies show that emphasis is placed on the affective side, in which facilitating behaviors such as empathy, touch, comforting, and supporting are considered essential in caring for patients with cancer. Unfortunately, further studies in this.   Communicating with others is an important part of life. In the clinical setting, communication both between health professionals; and with patients, is an important part of the therapeutic relationship. Choose an appropriate time to speak with the person or negotiate a time.

    SCOPE,* created by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins University. CDCynergy,† developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The six-stage planning model in the National Cancer Institute NCI “Pink Book.”. One such program is redevelopment of a nationally recognized resource, “Making Health Communication Programs Work,” [The “Pink Book”] which comprehensively addresses clear communication and reflects the best practices of all NIH Institutes and Centers as a shared resource. OCPL also maintains a resource Web site that includes synopses of research.

    Communication and the quality of information exchanged with patients about cancer and their treatment was commonly frustrated within interpreter-mediated consultations, particularly those.   The ASCO Educational Book is a collection of articles written by ASCO Annual Meeting speakers and oncology experts. Published annually, each volume highlights the most compelling research and developments across many different fields of cancer care. Building effective communication between the health care team and the person with cancer can have real effects on the cancer .


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Communicating cancer information by National Cancer Communications Conference (5th 1984 Washington, D.C.) Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book updates the evolution of truth-telling and communication patterns worldwide and offers insights into the recent trends and emerging challenges in communication with cancer patients 3/5(1). The book also discusses patient support groups, monitoring remission, and relapse.

Communicating with Cancer Patients is written by UK oncologists but has wide international application. Communicating with Cancer Patients book. Communicating with Cancer Patients.

DOI link for Communicating with Cancer Patients. Communicating with Cancer Patients book. By John F. Smyth. Edition 1st Edition. First Published eBook Published 14 October Pub. location Boca Raton.

Imprint CRC Press. Published in association with the European Society of Medical Oncology, this book is designed for trainee oncologists, oncology nurses, and those working with cancer patients on a day-to-day basis.

Communicating cancer information book Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and Communicating cancer information book to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

This PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family.

It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. Teamwork is a helpful booklet published by NCCS that aims to help cancer survivors better communicate with their physicians.

Developed by cancer survivors and health care professionals, this booklet addresses the need for good communication and provides a list of sound, practical questions that patients can use when talking with their doctor.

This PDQ cancer information summary has current information about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family. It is meant to inform and help patients, families, and caregivers. It does not give formal guidelines or recommendations for making decisions about health care.

In recent years we've seen huge changes in the digital channels through which people can access information. At Cancer Research UK we have looked hard to see how best we can communicate with the public through these media, not only to engage with people but also to ensure that they are provided with top quality information about cancer.

One thing we've noticed is that different channels work. "This book is original in that it examines in depth some current and particularly complex communication challenges for health professionals in cancer care. It offers a ‘communication compass’ to help understand and guide the process of patient-health professional communication.

Manufacturer: Springer. Resources about cancer for people with learning disabilities. There are leaflets, books, websites and videos about cancer for people with learning disabilities. They cover issues including signs of cancer, going to the doctors, checking for cancers and dealing with bereavement.

Published in association with the European Society of Medical Oncology, this book is designed for trainee oncologists, oncology nurses, and those working with cancer patients. This book focuses on the "soft skills" required in communicating with patients.

Topics include the aetiology of cancer, diagnosis and staging, and explaining the purpose of treatment, including chemotherapy, hormone treatment, and immunological and gene-based therapies.

Also discussed are patient support groups, monitoring remission, and relapse. Prof John Smyth talks to e cancer about his new book Communicating with Cancer Patients, his 30 years of experience setting up the medical oncology department at Edinburgh University and the continuing challenge of training young oncologists in the art of medicine and communicating with patients.

Whether you or someone you love has cancer, knowing what to expect can help you cope. From basic information about cancer and its causes to in-depth information on specific cancer types – including risk factors, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment options – you’ll find it here.

The statistics are overwhelming—in alone, over million cases of cancer were diagnosed in the with such an unwelcome volume in the population, cancer has long been seen as something we “fight,” going back as far as when former President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act, or, “The War on Cancer,” in The way many healthcare professionals talk about.

DCC PCC Book Front to 9/21/07 AM Page v. This monograph on Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care was written under contract from the Outcomes Research Branch of the Applied Research Program in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH.

The demand for health information continues to increase, but the ability of health professionals to provide it clearly remains variable. The aim of this book is (1) to summarize and synthesize research on the selection and presentation of data pertinent to public health, and (2) to provide practical suggestions, based on this research summary and synthesis, on how scientists and other public.

When Cancer Returns: Support for People With Cancer Outlines basic information regarding cancer recurrence, including communicating with your health care team as well as your family and friends, managing side effects, and coping with emotional and psychosocial issues. Communication has been defined as “the transmission of information, thoughts, and feelings so that they are satisfactorily received or understood.”1 Good patient communication involves recognizing and responding to the patient as a whole person—an approach frequently termed “patient-centered” care.

It also involves recognizing that in any. Introduction This paper reviews some of the new evidence-based approaches and interventions in cancer communication aimed at improving cancer care. This paper will address challenges specific to cancer communication, between patients and health-care professionals.Care teams can prescribe education and tailor information to patients at specific points along the care path – waiting room channels, in-hospital television channels, online, and on tablets.

Patients, families and caregivers have easy access. Tailored information is an important aspect of patient-centered communication. Common themes and characteristics are identified, including open mic communication, scarcity of health information, the commodification of breast cancer, unpredictable locations of conversation, and the use of gendered images and language.

The findings have potential implications for health promotion efforts using social media platforms.